Rights in Exile Programme

Refugee Legal Aid Information for Lawyers Representing Refugees Globally

India - COI

Click here to see the host countries of refugees originating from India.

Dr Gil Daryn 

Email: darynsasiaatgmail [dot] com

Dr Gil Daryn is a social anthropologist (Ph.D. Cambridge 2002) with expertise on the culture, society, history and politics of South Asia in general, with a particular specialization in gender issues in Nepal and India. Since 1989, and until he left in June 2011, he has travelled, conducted research, worked and lived in the region for a total of almost ten years. In addition, he became professionally engaged with Indian asylum seekers and refugees while working in UNHCR’s Kathmandu office as an Associate Durable Solutions Officer during 2008-9. In this capacity he was able to go through UNHCR’s archives, read in detail many private refugee files, and became familiar with India’s Country of Origin information and the RSD process. In addition, he also conducted interviews with many refugees and held detailed discussions with them. He later worked for various other international agencies for humanitarian aid and development. Since 2005, Dr Daryn has served as a consultant and expert on asylum and human rights issues in Tibet, Nepal, Pakistan India and Bhutan.

Dr D.N.S Dhakal

Email: dd24atduke [dot] edu or dinesh [dot] dhakalatduke [dot] edu
Website: www.fds.duke.edu/db/Sanford/dinesh.dhakal

Rohingya

Dr Dinesh Dhakal worked as the economic advisor of Bhutan government from August 1990 to October 1991; he left the country in protest when government began to evict ethnic Nepalese in 1990, labelling them as ‘anti-national’ and ‘illegal economic immigrants’. Since then he had been working for the resolution of the two-decade old Bhutanese refugee problem in Nepal and establishment of human rights and democracy in Bhutan. He has also specialized on the Rohingya in Nepal, India and Bhutan. He has done this work ‘under the cover’ of a prestigious academic career as an economist: first as a lecturer at Harvard (1989-2000), senior lecturer, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario (2001-2008), before becoming a senior fellow at Duke Center for International Development.

Professor Werner F Menski

Email: wm4atsoas [dot] ac [dot] uk 

Professor Werner Menski is Professor of South Asian Laws at School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London, and has expertise in Hindu law and Muslim law, particularly in family law matters. Muslim law expertise, in particular, could be relevant for asylum applications from South Asia when it comes to claims of Muslims, or especially minority members such as Ahmadis from Pakistan or people accused of blasphemy or abandoning their faith.

Dr Clarinda Still

Email: clarinda [dot] stillatarea [dot] ox [dot] ac [dot] uk

Dr Clarinda Still, Postdoctoral Researcher, Contemporary South Asian Studies Programme, SIAS, University of Oxford. Dr Still trained as a social anthropologist at Edinburgh, UCL and the LSE, and joined the Contemporary South Asian Studies Programme in the School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies in Oxford in 2008. Her research is based in rural Andhra Pradesh, Southeast India and is primarily concerned with Dalits (earlier known as ‘Untouchables’), especially Dalit women. Dr Still’s work looks at different forms of inequality (caste, class and gender), education, identity, affirmative action and labour relations. Her new book (Dalit women: honour and patriarchy in South India) explores the effects of a new ‘politics of culture’ on Dalit gender relations and a Dalit notion of honour. 

Dr Joya Chatterji

Email: jc280atcam [dot] ac [dot] uk

Chatterji Joya is the Director of the Institute for Modern South Asian History at the University of Cambridge. He is an expert on India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. His research topics are migrants, minorities and citizenship, South Asian history, Muslim migration, secularization, South Asian Diaspora, Refugee in west Bengal and the Bengali Muslims. He authored and published extensively and lectured in different universities around the world especially in the UK, India and the US. He speaks Hindi, Bengali, Urdu, Assamese, Punjabi.

Dr Nitasha Kaul

Email: nitasha [dot] kaulatgmail [dot] com

Nitasha Kaul is a Kashmiri novelist, academic, poet and economist. She is currently an Assistant Professor in Department of Politics and International Relations (DPIR) at University of Westminster, London, and has previously been a tenured academic in Economics at the Bristol Business School and in Creative Writing at Royal Thimphu College in Bhutan. Her research and writing over the last decade and a half has been on identity, justice, political economy, democracy, feminist and postcolonial thought, Kashmir and Bhutan. She speaks within and outside academia, on issues of justice and borders. In her recent work, she has addressed issues of nationalism and neoliberalism in contemporary India and the question of nation-states and refugees in Europe. She has authored books including the scholarly monograph ‘Imagining Economics Otherwise’ (Routledge, 2007/2008) and a Man Asian Literary Prize shortlisted novel ‘Residue’ (Rainlight, 2014).

Siddharth Kara

Email: siddharth_karaathks [dot] harvard [dot] edu

Siddharth Kara is one of the world's foremost experts on human trafficking and contemporary slavery. He is the Director of the Program on Human Trafficking and Modern Slavery at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, where he is also an Adjunct Lecturer and teaches the only course on human trafficking at HKS. In addition, Kara is a Visiting Scientist on Forced Labor at the Harvard School of Public Health. Kara is the author of Sex Trafficking: Inside the Business of Modern Slavery, co-winner of the prestigious 2010 Frederick Douglass Award at Yale University for the best non-fiction book on slavery. Sex Trafficking is the first book on modern forms of slavery to win the prize. Kara's second book, Bonded Labor: Tackling the System of Slavery in South Asia was released in October, 2012. Just as Sex Trafficking provided the first comprehensive overview of the global sex trafficking industry, Bonded Labor provides the first comprehensive overview of the system of debt bondage endemic to South Asia. Kara currently advises the United Nations, International Labour Organisation, the U.S. Government, and several other governments on anti-trafficking policy and law. Kara has testified before the U.S. Congress and several foreign Parliaments on his research. Kara's has also appeared extensively in the media as an expert on modern slavery, including on CNN, the BBC, the Guardian, CNBC, National Geographic, and numerous documentary films.

Dr Ulrich Pagel

Email: up1atsoas [dot] ac [dot] uk

Dr Pagel's areas of expertise are Indo-Tibetan Buddhism and Buddhist Monasticism. He has published and edited several books, including Buddhist Monks in Tax Disputes: Monastic Attitudes towards Revenue Collection in Ancient India (2014), Dhondup, Yangdon and Pagel, Ulrich and Samuel, Geoffrey, eds. (2013) Monastic and Lay Traditions in North-Eastern Tibet. and Pagel, Ulrich and Skorupski, Tadeusz, eds. (1994) The Buddhist Forum III: Papers in honour and appreciation of Professor David Seyfort Ruegg's contribution to Indological, Buddhist and Tibetan Studies. He held the position of General Secretary at the International Association of Buddhist Studies (2011), or the Editor-in-Chief at the Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies (2010).

Lawrence Cohen

Email: cohenatberkeley [dot] edu

Lawrence Cohen is Sarah Kailath Professor of India Studies and Professor of Anthropology and South and Southeast Asian Studies at UC Berkeley, where he directs the Institute for South Asia Studies. A medical anthropologist, his India-based work has focused on four areas: (1) aging and the elderly, (2) queer/LGBT lives and politics, (3) medical markets and "trafficking" in organs, and their regulation, and (4) biometric identification, financial inclusion, and privacy. Lawrence Cohen has studied and had fellowships in Delhi and Simla. His fieldwork has been primarily in urban north India (Banaras, Lucknow, Allahabad), in the metropoli (Delhi, Calcutta, Mumbai, Chennai, and Bangalore), and in parts of rural U.P., Tamil Nadu, and Andhra Pradesh. His articles on same-sex desire ainclude "The Pleasures of Castration: the Postoperative Status of Hijras, Jankhas, and Academics," and "Holi in Banaras and the Mahaland of Modernity". Related work includes a 1999 essay, "The History of Semen: Notes on a Culture-Bound Syndrome," Medicine and ta 1997 commentary "Semen, Irony, and the Atom Bomb".

Dr Louise Harrington

Email: lh11atsoas [dot] ac [dot] uk

Dr. Louise Harrington trained in literary, film and cultural studies in Trinity College Dublin and the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. She is currently a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Alberta in Canada, working on cultural responses to global partitions and ethno-religious conflict. She has conducted fieldwork in Bengal and the India-Bangladesh borderlands, researching the everyday impact of the border and the legacy of partition. She has published on the Bangladesh Liberation War, female militancy, violence against women, trauma and displacement. Her research topics include (forced) migration and transnationalism, war and conflict, border studies, life in post-conflict societies, and gender and sexuality. 

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